Mike Huckabee

1 week ago
Government officials are not allowed to use their platforms for campaigning. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) has filed a complaint with the Office of Special Counsel, alleging that Sarah Huckabee Sanders—White House press secretary under the Trump Administration and daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee—violated the Hatch Act of 1939 by tweeting a photo of herself with rapper Kanye West.Passed when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president, the Hatch Act of 1939 was named after Sen. Carl Hatch of New Mexico and forbids most employees of the executive branch of the federal government from certain overtly partisan activities or communications (exceptions include the president and the vice-president). And CREW is alleging that Sanders’ tweet violated the Hatch Act because West was wearing a pro-Trump “Make America Great Again” hat in the photo.Of course, Twitter didn’t exist back in 1939. But it was amended in 2012 and now applies to mo...
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1 week ago
It would be a bold move — but it's no longer unthinkable. With Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation, the far right now has a majority on the U.S. Supreme Court—which means that everything from abortion rights and gay rights and to health care reform could be on the chopping block. The High Court already leaned conservative, but while the retired Justice Anthony Kennedy (appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1987) was a right-winger with libertarian leanings at times, Kavanaugh is much more of a social conservative in the Clarence Thomas/Antonin Scalia vein. And this new edition of the Court could not only further the theocratic agenda of the Christian Right, but also, overturn the Affordable Care Act of 2010, criminalize affirmative action or attack voting rights—all of which makes an argument in favor of something President Franklin Delano Roosevelt attempted in the 1930s: Court packing.Presently, the Supreme Court has nine seats, but were the Court to be pac...
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2 weeks ago
The highest court in the land is in desperate need of some changes. Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh has turned out to be the most controversial, divisive and unpopular Supreme Court nominee since Judge Robert Bork in 1987. According to recent polls, the number of Americans who support his confirmation ranges from 34% (NBC News/Wall Street Journal) to 39% (Gallup). But despite Kavanaugh’s unpopularity—and despite the fact that at least three women have accused him of sexual abuse—President Donald Trump isn’t about to withdraw the nomination. Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are determined to see Kavanaugh’s confirmation rammed through as quickly as possible. And the fact that Kavanaugh, now 53, could still be sitting on the Supreme Court 30 or 35 years from now begs the question: should Supreme Court justices be subject to term limits?The U.S. government, for the most part, has excellent checks and balances at the federal, state and local levels. Presidents are...
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