Jeff Sessions

5 hours ago
Critics are continuing to put pressure on Matthew Whitaker after he was named as temporary replacement for Jeff Sessions. The Justice Department says the law is clear: He can stay.
www.npr.org
10 hours ago
Alarm bells understandably rang earlier this month when Matthew G. Whitaker, the chief of staff to fired Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions, leapfrogged over more senior — and Senate-confirmed — Justice Department officials to become President Trump’s acting attorney general. It’s hard to imagine a less...
13 hours ago
Working at a small law firm based in Des Moines, Whitaker represented several dozen accused criminals in cases with little or no profile outside his home state, according to a review of his legal work in local, state and federal court, and interviews with attorneys who worked with him. Aside from a five-year stint as a U.S. attorney in Iowa, his highest-profile venture was the past 13 months as ousted Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ chief of staff. Whitaker’s sudden elevation has stoked outrage in the legal community and among Democrats, who claim President Donald Trump selected him because he has publicly criticized Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe.
www.yahoo.com
23 hours ago
A new court filing says the appointment has "no effect on this case." In a new filing with the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, Special Counsel Robert Mueller argued Monday that despite the dubious appointment of Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, he retains the full powers of a U.S. attorney granted him under the regulations governing special counsels.When President Donald Trump appointed Whitaker, many plausibly argued that it was a blatant attempt to undermine the Russia investigation led by Mueller. But because Whitaker was never approved by the Senate — and others at the Justice Department in line to be attorney general were — many have argued that his appointment is unconstitutional. If the courts agree, it could invalidate anything he does in the role.However, Mueller is claiming that his powers have not been diminished as a result. For the particular case in question, a subpoena of Roger Stone ally Andrew Miller, the brief argued that since the investig...
www.alternet.org
1 day ago
"If [Matt] Whitaker acts to shut down [Robert] Muller, he too will be guilty of obstruction of justice and a conspirator in that crime." When Tim Weiner’s book “Enemies: A History of the FBI” was published in 2012, he may not have envisioned that one day it would inspire a documentary series meant to place the erratic actions of Donald Trump into context.Another president? Sure. But not a guy best known as the host of “The Apprentice” when “Enemies” first came out.“Let’s examine reality television,” Weiner mused in a recent phone interview, in support of Showtime’s four-part series “Enemies: The President, Justice & the FBI.”  "That is fake news. I grew up in New York, you know. I've been watching Trump since the '70s and everybody within the realm of reason knows that he is a grifter and a con man. He is now also the most powerful man on Earth.”A week after Trump asked for the resignation of United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions...
www.alternet.org
1 day ago
"The stakes are too high to allow the president to install an unconfirmed lackey to lead the Department of Justice." Denouncing President Donald Trump's appointment of acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker—a fervent critic of the Russia probe—as a blatant effort to "subvert the Constitution to protect himself and evade accountability," three Democratic senators on Monday filed suit against the White House and demanded that Whitaker be barred from temporarily serving as the nation's top law enforcement official."The stakes are too high to allow the president to install an unconfirmed lackey to lead the Department of Justice—a lackey whose stated purpose, apparently, is undermining a major investigation into the president," declared Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), who joined fellow Democratic Sens. Mazie Hirono (Hawaii) and Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) in filing the lawsuit."We want the court to make clear that the Senate must confirm Matthew Whitaker's appoi...
www.alternet.org
1 day ago
A future Trumpian world, including possibly a shattered and increasingly “nationalist” Europe, is no laughing matter. Whatever you may think of President Trump, it’s important to be fair to him. You might have noticed that, on his recent trip to France (“five days of fury”), officially to mourn and praise America’s war dead on the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, he managed to miss his first scheduled ceremony. It was at a cemetery where some of those American war dead were buried. He skipped it, thanks to a little uncomfortable rain, and came late for the second of those events at the Suresnes American Cemetery just outside Paris (this time complaining publicly about the rain). As TomDispatch regular Rajan Menon reminds us today, such acts brought a good deal of derision upon the president in Europe and here (or rather in the world of everywhere that we know as the Internet). What went unreported amid the mockery and the presidential excuses (the preside...
www.alternet.org
2 days ago
In an interview with the "Fox News Sunday" program taped on Friday, Trump also said he probably would not agree to a sit-down interview with Mueller, who also is investigating whether the Republican president's campaign conspired with Moscow and whether Trump has unlawfully sought to obstruct the probe. Whitaker took over supervision of Mueller's investigation on Nov. 7 after Trump appointed him as the chief U.S. law enforcement official to replace Jeff Sessions, who the president ousted. Whitaker, who Democrats have called a Trump "political lackey," in the past criticized the scope of the Mueller probe and brought up the possibility of undermining it by slashing Mueller's funding.
www.yahoo.com
2 days ago
President Trump on Sunday claimed he was unaware that Matthew Whitaker had been publicly critical of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation prior to picking him to replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general....
2 days ago
Sen. Roy Blunt, a Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee, is interviewed on "This Week" about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi and the replacement for Jeff Sessions as Attorney General.
www.yahoo.com
3 days ago
The president had endorsed a reform bill, but that didn’t matter to Mitch. Prospects for a major federal sentencing reform bill brightened on Wednesday with President Trump’s announcement that he would support the effort, but by week’s end, those prospects dimmed abruptly as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) told the president he wouldn’t bring the bill to a floor vote this year.The bill is known as the First Step Act. The House passed a version of this in spring, but the House version was limited to reforms on the “back end,” such as slightly increasing good time credits for federal prisoners and providing higher levels of reentry and rehabilitation services.The Senate bill crafted by a handful of key senators and pushed hard by presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner incorporates the language of the House bill, but also adds actual sentencing reforms. Under the Senate bill:Thousands of prisoners sentenced for crack cocaine offenses before August 2010 (the...
www.alternet.org
3 days ago
It's been over a week since Democrats won the House. Here are some of the most insane reactions. This year, Democrats managed to win back control of the House for the first time in nearly a decade. Predictably, many on the Right were dismayed, both those who were expecting the loss and those who had been duped by President Donald Trump's confident prediction that there would be a "red wave."Just more than a week out from the Democrats' victory, here are some of the craziest reactions from conservatives to the news they would no longer hold unified control of the federal government:Donald Trump: It wasn't actually that bad, but if it was, it wasn't my fault.This week, Trump sat for an interview with the conservative Daily Caller. When asked by reporters Saagar Enjeti and Benny Johnson whether the House loss was of any significance to him, he immediately downplayed it — and then said he was the reason things weren't even worse."I think I did very well," said Trump. "Because...
www.alternet.org
3 days ago
Critics have said the Republican president's appointment of Whitaker, who now will oversee Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russia's role in the 2016 U.S. election, on Nov. 7 to replace the ousted Jeff Sessions as the chief U.S. law enforcement official violated the Constitution and federal law. Lawyers for Barry Michaels, who filed a lawsuit in Nevada challenging a U.S. law that bars him from buying a firearm due to prior non-violent criminal convictions, decided to make Whitaker's appointment an issue in their pending appeal before the high court because Sessions was named as a defendant in the case. The lawyers told the justices that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein should be the acting attorney general.
www.yahoo.com
3 days ago
Matthew Whitaker, the acting attorney general appointed by President Trump to replace Jeff Sessions, has deep roots in Iowa — and a history there that a leading Democrat says “raises troubling questions” about how he has used his official powers.
www.yahoo.com
4 days ago
Oops, he did it again. If there’s one thing you might have thought Donald Trump has learned in the past two years it’s that it was a huge mistake to go on TV with Lester Holt and admit that he was thinking about the Russia investigation when he decided to fire FBI Director James Comey. Recall that Trump was just rambling, in his stream-of-consciousness mode, when he just blurted it out without prompting. That revealing statement was not only what precipitated the appointment of Robert Mueller, it was also one of the most compelling pieces of evidence that Trump was trying to obstruct justice when he fired Comey — an apparent confession of intent. Trump has said and done hundreds of stupid things during his tenure, but that one really stands out as the blunder of all blunders.This article was originally published at SalonOops, he did it again. This week, in the midst of what observers everywhere are characterizing as a meltdown, Trump gave an interview to the Daily Call...
www.alternet.org
4 days ago
Many will point to him as a historic champion for “law and order” conservatism at the highest level. Steven Mulroy, University of MemphisPresident Donald Trump’s sacking of Attorney General Jeff Sessions has raised concerns among those who wish to see the investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller continue unimpeded.Those same people will likely not lament Session’s ouster based on what he accomplished as attorney general. In my view, his tenure as attorney general saw him on the wrong side of most important law enforcement decisions. On the other hand, many will point to him as a historic champion for “law and order” conservatism at the highest level.Here are three areas where Sessions will most be remembered.1. Controversial from the startSessions’ tenure began back in early 2017. During his confirmation hearings, Sessions testified incorrectly under oath that he had had no contacts with Russian officials during his active role in the 2016 Trump campaign. Whe...
www.alternet.org
4 days ago
George Conway, the husband of Trump's campaign manager and White House counselor, has renounced the GOP and formed a group to oppose Trump. He explains the decision in a new interview. It is no secret that President Donald Trump's counselor Kellyanne Conway, a prominent mouthpiece for the administration who ran Trump's 2016 campaign, does not see eye to eye with her husband on the administration.George Conway, a conservative lawyer who was previously offered a high-level job in Trump's Justice Department, has repeatedly criticized Trump's dishonesty and attacks on the rule of law on Twitter. This week, he took things even further by forming a new group of conservative and libertarian lawyers to oppose Trump, called Checks and Balances.Sitting for an interview with Yahoo News podcast "Skullduggery," Conway explained his decision to leave the Republican Party."I don't feel comfortable being a Republican anymore," he said. "I think the Republican Party has become something of a...
www.alternet.org
4 days ago
Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) offered his thoughts on who should replace former Attorney General Jeff Sessions during an interview with Breitbart News Deputy Political Editor Amanda House. 
www.breitbart.com
4 days ago
"This is probably the moment we've been waiting for." With the stakes growing ever higher in President Donald Trump's efforts to undermine Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow argued Thursday night that we may have already reached a tipping point in this saga.She pointed out that, in a tweet Thursday morning, Trump referred to the "inner workings' of the Mueller investigation, a phrase he has never used before. Maddow argued that this indicates Trump has used his new dubiously appointed Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to gain an unprecedented look inside the Russia investigation.But it's not just this development bringing tensions to a head. She laid out an intricate case suggesting that we are very close to a dramatic new chapter in the investigation and in Trump's presidency."There is now reason to seriously question whether, in his new role as acting attorney general, Matt Whitaker is already feeding inside inform...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
His complaints are becoming oddly specific. It's never a surprise when President Donald Trump goes on the attack against Special Counsel Robert Mueller — at this point, that's just par for the corrupt course. But there was something unusual and provocative in the president's latest salvo against the Russia investigaiton on Thursday morning.Instead of merely railing against the investigation as "witch hunt," the president had specific criticisms of the investigators' behavior, leveling a more pointed critique against the Mueller team than he often does."The inner workings of the Mueller investigation are a total mess," he wrote. "They have found no collusion and have gone absolutely nuts. They are screaming and shouting at people, horribly threatening them to come up with the answers they want. They are a disgrace to our Nation and don’t... ....care how many lives the ruin. These are Angry People, including the highly conflicted Bob Mueller, who worked for Obama for 8 years. T...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
“It’s just tragic how Republicans who claim to be invested in the Constitution are allowing Donald Trump to attack the rule of law in plain sight." President Donald Trump has been very active on Twitter this week, bombarding his favorite social media outlet with a flurry of tweets attacking Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia-related investigation—and NeverTrump conservative Max Boot, interviewed by CNN’s Brooke Baldwin on November 15, cited those tweets as evidence that Trump is “feeling the heat.”After the midterms, Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and replaced him with loyalist Matt Whitaker—who has been a vocal critic of Mueller’s investigation. Boot told Baldwin that when he read Trump’s recent tweets, he was especially troubled by the president’s reference to the investigation’s “inner workings.” Boot said of Trump, “His henchman has just been appointed acting attorney general, and even though he has not shut down the Muelle...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
The diatribe came amid claims that Trump is maneuvering to have Mueller fired or otherwise shut down before he can close in on the president and his inner circle, including family members. Last week, Trump sacked his attorney general Jeff Sessions, replacing him with Matthew Whitaker, who is on the record as being harshly critical of the Mueller investigation.
www.yahoo.com
5 days ago
President Donald Trump has once again lashed out at special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, claiming broadly — and without any evidence — that the probe’s inner workings are “a total mess”. Mr Trump unleashed the tirade on Twitter just over a week after midterm election losses delivered a rebuke to Mr Trump’s presidency by handing control of the House of Representatives back to Democrats for the first time in eight years. Just after the elections Attorney General Jeff Sessions was ousted from his post, with Mr Trump having repeatedly criticised Mr Sessions for recusing himself from overseeing the probe into Russian election meddling and possible collusion with Trump campaign officials.
www.yahoo.com
5 days ago
The Justice Department and Gates’ attorneys agreed to give the court another update by January 15, 2019. Some of President Donald Trump’s closest associates—from former campaign manager Paul Manafort to former personal attorney Michael Cohen to 2016 campaign aide Rick Gates—flipped on the president and have been fully cooperating in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia-related investigation. Gates, during the Summer of 2018, was the star witness in Manafort’s criminal trial. And Gates’ sentencing has been delayed so that his cooperation in Mueller’s probe can continue.Gates confessed to a long list of financial crimes during his in-depth testimony against Manafort, his former business partner. And in a joint memo filed this week in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, attorneys for Gates and Mueller stated that Gates “continues to cooperate with respect to several ongoing investigations, and accordingly, the parties do not believe it...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
When asked his thoughts on the attorney general situation, Trump brought up Robert Mueller's investigation totally unprompted. When President Donald Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions a day after the midterm elections and replaced him with former U.S. attorney and DOJ chief of staff Matthew Whitaker, there was an unspoken but obvious reason for his decision. It was telegraphed by Whitaker's long history of opposing special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Trump's ties to Russia, calling it a "witch hunt" and warning that any probe into the Trump family finances was a "red line."So it was remarkable when Trump, in a Thursday interview with the right-wing Daily Caller, came out and said it directly."Could you tell us where your thinking is currently on the attorney general position?" asked Daily Caller reporters Saagar Enjeti and Benny Johnson."Matthew Whitaker is a very respected man," said Trump. "He's — and he's, very importantly, he’s respected within...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
In a last-minute act, Mr. Sessions limited the Justice Department’s ability to oversee local police reforms. The move raises questions about what this hands-off approach means for existing agreements.
www.nytimes.com
5 days ago
Last week's surprise forced resignation of Jeff Sessions as attorney general of the United States set in motion a series of events that will soon resonate in all corners of the Department of Justice.
5 days ago
When Ripoff Report posted complaints about World Patent Marketing, Matthew Whitaker personally called the founder and yelled at him. One of the many problems with President Donald Trump's decision to appoint former U.S. attorney and Jeff Sessions' chief of staff Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general, aside from his extremism, his partisanship, and the fact that he may not be legally eligible for the role, is the ethical questions surrounding his involvement in World Patent Marketing, a Miami-based company that was shut down by the Federal Trade Commission as a scam.World Patent Marketing, on whose board Whitaker sat, would recruit people who had inventions, tell them that they would be a big hit and were in review by the board, and bilked them out of their money while doing little to nothing, oftentimes even knowingly accepting "inventions" that already existed. Furthermore, when customers complained it was a scam, in at least one case, Whitaker himself warned that he was a...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
The Republican midterm loss and the firing of Jeff Sessions blew up the narrative of the QAnon conspiracy theory. Now its believers are at each others' throats. The "QAnon" community is falling apart.Perhaps no conspiracy theory has thrived more readily in the dark corners of the internet since it was first born last October on the infamous troll message board 4chan following President Donald Trump's vague remarks last year at a military dinner that it was the "calm before the storm." An anonymous user claiming to be a high-level government informant and calling himself "Q" after the highest level of security clearance at the Energy Department, began leaving cryptic messages he called "crumbs" which were supposed to be hints as to a wide-scale government operation known as "The Storm" to take down government corruption and the new world order, with Trump at the center. While the messages often had very specific dates, many aspects of them were purposefully vague, allowing be...
www.alternet.org
5 days ago
Donald Trump fired Jeff Sessions and replaced him with Matthew Whitaker, a giant tool who thinks Biblical law should prevail in America's courtrooms. He's also a scammer. Back in 2014, Whitaker joined the advisory board of a Miami Beach scam company called World Patent Marketing (they were later shut down and fined $26,000,000 by the FTC) (the company is under investigation by the FBI). World Patent Marketing charged inventors to help them bring their products to market, accepting bizarre patents for unworkable products that were never actually manufactured, bilking their customers out of thousands of dollars each. Whitaker actively defended World Patent Marketing against its critics, citing his credentials as a former US Attorney as a reason to trust that World Patent Marketing was on the up-and-up (Whitaker denies any knowledge of the company's wrongdoing). Among the products that World Patent Marketing marketed were: a "masculine toilet" for guys with giant dicks, designed t...
6 days ago
The special counsel's investigation is plowing forward. The fate of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia-related investigation is in question now that President Donald Trump has fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and replaced with him loyalist Matthew Whitaker, who has been a vocal critic of the probe. But Mueller’s investigation continues for the time being—and CNN is reporting that Mueller’s team is now taking a close look at long-time Trump ally Roger Stone’s communications with WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange and the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.Stone has said that during the election, he communicated with Assange indirectly via an “intermediary,” “mutual acquaintance” or “back channel.” Stone has also said that he spoke to Trump an average of once per week during the campaign, and Mueller’s team is investigating whether or not Stone shared information he believed to be from WikiLeaks with Trump’s campaign.In a November...
www.alternet.org
 
6 days ago
The Justice Department on Wednesday defended the legality of President Donald Trump's appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general to replace the ousted Jeff Sessions, rejecting the views of critics that the move ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution and federal law.
www.reuters.com
 
6 days ago
The Justice Department on Wednesday defended the legality of President Donald Trump's appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general to replace the ousted Jeff Sessions, rejecting the views of critics that the move ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution and federal law.
www.reuters.com
6 days ago
The Justice Department on Wednesday released a memo that called President Trump’s appointment of loyalist Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general legal — rejecting charges that the move violated the Constitution. Since Trump named him to replace Jeff Sessions last week, legal experts — including George Conway, husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway —...
nypost.com
6 days ago
The Justice Department dismissed claims Wednesday that acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's appointment to succeed Jeff Sessions is unconstitutional.
www.upi.com
6 days ago
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are facing renewed pressure to pass legislation to protect special counsel Robert Mueller, with a handful of GOP senators urging their leadership to hold a vote now that President Donald Trump has pushed out Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Republican Sen. Jeff Flake and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons say they will […]
6 days ago
The Office of Legal Counsel said the appointment is "consistent with the Federal Vacancies Reform Act (VRA) of 1998." The Dept. of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel has just issued an opinion allowing former CNN commentator Matthew Whitaker to serve as Acting Attorney General. That opinion covers only the constitutionality of installing Whitaker as Acting AG, and does not explore the ethical issues surrounding his appointment, nor the ethical issues involving his background.Fox News reports the Office of Legal Counsel "said that the president’s appointment of Whitaker to replace former Attorney General Jeff Sessions was consistent with the Federal Vacancies Reform Act (VRA) of 1998."CNBC adds that the OLC's opinion was drafted "before Trump appointed him to that post."But even former Bush 43 highly-controversial Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Yoo penned an op-ed titled, "Whitaker’s Appointment Is Unconstitutional."Whitaker has a history as a CNN commenta...
www.alternet.org
6 days ago
The Justice Department Office of Legal Counsel made the right call Wednesday when it issued a legal opinion upholding President Trump’s authority to appoint Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general outside the line of succession, replacing fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
6 days ago
Trump claimed a “great victory,” but knows better. He’s been betrayed by his party and his voters, and it shows. President Donald Trump is not himself. And by "not himself" I mean he seems to have lost his swagger. Ever since the midterm elections, he's been churlish and petulant. His brazen braggadocio is suddenly dull and off-key. The question is what exactly has him brooding and upset.Sure, he held a press conference the morning after the election at which he ludicrously asserted, "I’ll be honest: I think it was a great victory. And actually, some of the news this morning was that it was, in fact, a great victory." The news that morning was nothing of the kind, of course. And even he couldn't pull it off.  He rapidly devolved into his patented media-bashing to change the subject and ended up looking like the worst sore loser in presidential history.That same day he fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and replaced him with someone he believed would protect him fro...
www.alternet.org
6 days ago
The Justice Department told Trump, before he tapped Whitaker for the job, that he could appoint Whitaker as acting head of Justice. Whitaker was named to the post a week ago, after Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
 
6 days ago
The U.S. Justice Department defended the legality of President Donald Trump's appointment of Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker on Wednesday, saying he has the authority to name a replacement for the fired Jeff Sessions outside of the department's line of succession.
www.reuters.com
 
6 days ago
The U.S. Justice Department defended the legality of President Donald Trump's appointment of Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker on Wednesday, saying he has the authority to name a replacement for the fired Jeff Sessions outside of the department's line of succession.
www.reuters.com
6 days ago
The departure of Jeff Sessions removes one obstacle to the legislation, but the president remains concerned about appearing soft on crime.
6 days ago
"In order to prevent a breakdown of federal law enforcement, the White House should hurry to select a permanent attorney general before any more damage is done." Many legal and constitutional scholars have come forward to decry President Donald Trump's appointment of Matthew Whitaker as the new acting attorney general — part of a blatant attempt to wrest control of Robert Mueller's Russia investigation — as fundamentally illegitimate.Former deputy assistant attorney general John Yoo, who served under President George W. Bush, joined the chorus calling out the appointment as unconstitutional in a new opinion piece for The Atlantic Tuesday. He also noted, provocatively, that the constitutionality of the appointment provides an opening for Mueller to protect the investigation from undue interference.Yoo and others argue that the Constitution's requirement that all principal officers in the executive branch be approved by the Senate rules out Whitaker's appointment. As...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
Author of “Trump on the Couch” suggests therapy: Trump struggles against “fear of his inner chaos,” and needs help Donald Trump evidently believes he is above the law. Last week, he fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions and replaced him with Matthew Whitaker, a political operative from Iowa whose only apparent qualification is his public opposition to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Russia scandal. This is but the most recent example of Trump's apparent efforts to obstruct justice.Trump's lack of respect for the country's long-standing democratic norms and institutions also extends to America's alliances, security arrangements with its allies and friends, and the international order more broadly. To that end  Trump has threatened to remove the U.S. from NATO, hailed the merits of nationalism (while barely pretending that does not mean white nationalism), tried to surrender U.S. security to Russian President Vladimir Putin and proclaimed on numerous...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
The State of Maryland is challenging the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general, arguing that Donald Trump overstepped his constitutional authority in doing so. President Trump named Mr Whitaker as acting attorney general after forecing former Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign just a day after the midterm elections last week, sparking concern that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election could be in jeopardy under the temporary leadership.
www.yahoo.com
1 week ago
It's the constitutional remedy for a criminal president. A week after the 2018 midterms, the news keeps getting better for Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Democrats needed to gain 23 or more seats in order to obtain a House majority; as of November 13, they have gained at least 32—although that number could climb as high as 38, 39 or 40 after all the votes are counted. Republicans appear to have slightly increased their majority in the Senate, but November 6 was undeniably a blue wave in the House—not to mention all the state legislature seats that Democrats won.And with all those victories comes talk of impeaching President Donald Trump.But impeachment, even with the new House majority, probably isn’t on the table—which doesn’t mean that House Democrats won’t find many other ways in which to be a major thorn in the president’s side.Only two days after the election, the New York Times ran an op-ed by billionaire Democratic activist Tom Steyer th...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
The office of first lady Melania Trump said Tuesday deputy national security adviser Mira Ricardel should be dismissed from her post, an extraordinary call that came as President Trump considers further shakeups to his Cabinet after the departure of Jeff Sessions as attorney general.
1 week ago
Trump installed Whitaker as acting attorney general last week after ordering Jeff Sessions to resign from the post. Trump had repeatedly criticized Sessions for recusing himself in March 2017 from the federal investigation, now headed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, into Russia's role in the 2016 U.S. election, a probe Trump has called a "witch hunt." Congressional Democrats have voiced concern that Whitaker, a Trump loyalist, could undermine or even fire Mueller. Maryland asked U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander in Baltimore to bar Whitaker from appearing in an official capacity as acting attorney general in its ongoing lawsuit against the administration over the Affordable Care Act healthcare law.
www.yahoo.com
1 week ago
It has nothing to do with national security. President Trump's long-expected post-midterms White House shakeup is underway, with Attorney General Jeff Sessions being the first to get the boot. But a much larger White House exodus is being planned, reportedly including Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen and Chief of Staff John Kelly.But there are others expected to get pink slips.A Trump administration top national security official is reportedly also on the firing list, for reasons that appear to have nothing to do with national security."The president has also decided to remove Mira Ricardel, the top deputy for national security adviser John Bolton, officials said," The Wall Street Journal reports."The president became involved in that decision at the urging of first lady Melania Trump, whose staff battled with Ms. Ricardel during the first lady’s trip to Africa last month over seating on the plane and requests to use National Security Council resources, ac...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
The chief of staff may be next on the chopping block. Despite frequently refuting reports that his time at the White House was coming to an end, Chief of Staff John Kelly may have finally crossed someonE who will seal his fate: First Lady Melania Trump.According to a new report from NBC News, Kelly is among the top administration officials expected to be ousted soon in the aftermath of the 2018 midterm elections, along with his protege Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. While President Donald Trump's differences with Nielsen reportedly center around her approach to border policy, it seems some of Kelly's own biggest problems are personal.The first lady reportedly went directly to the president with some of her complaints. According to the report, Kelly did not treat the first lady's staff as equal to his own staffers, delaying their requests for promotions. The report also found that he got on the first lady's "wrong side" with regard to her requests for travel plans."...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
Trump has been as outrageous as ever on Twitter. President Donald Trump can always be counted on to post outrageous things on Twitter, his favorite social media outlet. Twitter’s format lends itself to soundbites, not in-depth or nuanced analysis—and Trump is a master of soundbites, which is why the president is so effective at using Twitter to rally and fire up his far-right base. Some liberals and progressives have argued that Twitter should terminate—or at least suspend—Trump’s account in light of all the offensive things he has posted. But that’s a terrible idea. First, it’s important to know what one’s political opponents think and believe, however misguided they are. Second, Democrats should be happy that Trump’s tweets are making the GOP brand look so bad—and post-2018 midterms, Trump has been as outrageous as ever on Twitter.Here are six of President Trump’s most-outrageous post-midterms tweets.1. Trump Implied That Kyrsten Sinema Was Trying to Steal...
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1 week ago
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is requesting that acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker and ousted attorney general Jeff Sessions testify before the Judiciary Committee in the wake of the Justice Department shakeup....
1 week ago
Maryland officials will ask a federal judge for an injunction and argue that Matthew Whitaker is not the legitimate acting U.S. attorney general, the New York Times reported on Tuesday, citing a draft court filing expected in a healthcare lawsuit against the Trump administration. Whitaker became the acting attorney general last week after President Donald Trump ordered Jeff Sessions to resign following months of criticizing him for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, which Trump has repeatedly called a "witch hunt." The Times said Maryland officials on Tuesday were expected to ask Federal District Court for the District of Maryland Judge Ellen Hollander to determine Sessions' legal successor as part of the lawsuit filed before the former attorney general's ouster, according to the Times.
www.yahoo.com
1 week ago
The state of Maryland is expected to challenge the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general in court on Tuesday on the grounds that president Trump cannot appoint someone who lacks Senate confirmation to lead an agency. The request for an injunction blocking Whitaker’s appointment is part of an ongoing lawsuit the state filed against former attorney general Jeff Sessions in his official capacity. Since Sessions has been fired, Maryland is asking the court to treat deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein as the acting attorney general for purposes of the lawsuit, on the basis that Trump was constitutionally obligated to appoint Rosenstein to serve until a permanent successor could be chosen, given he was next in the chain of command and has already been confirmed by the Senate.
www.yahoo.com
1 week ago
The “debate” over the Jim Acosta video shows the right has no use for facts. Is there any way to talk to them? Last week, Donald Trump's administration pulled off another of the routine stunts it uses to hijack the media narrative, whip up the right-wing base, and distract both journalists and pundits from more important news stories. On Wednesday, Trump used a press conference to create a reality TV-style beef with CNN reporter Jim Acosta. First he got testy with Acosta for asking pointed questions, and then he directed a White House intern to try to confiscate Acosta's microphone. Acosta's efforts to hold onto the microphone resulted in incidentally touching the female intern's arm.White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders immediately pretended to believe that a brief brush-off was the equivalent of deliberate gendered violence, using a doctored video created by a conspiracy theory website to back up her obvious bad-faith claims. This lie became the pretense for...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
"Acting AG Matt Whitaker is fully committed to following all appropriate processes and procedures at the Department of Justice, including consulting with senior ethics officials on his oversight responsibilities and matters that may warrant recusal," spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said in a statement. Whitaker became the acting attorney general last week after President Donald Trump ordered Jeff Sessions to resign following months of criticizing him for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, which Trump has repeatedly called a "witch hunt." Sessions' recusal paved the way for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to appoint Special Counsel Robert Mueller in May 2017. The investigation has already led to criminal charges against dozens of people, including Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
www.yahoo.com
1 week ago
Heather Mac Donald — the New York Times bestselling author, Manhattan Institute fellow, and City Journal contributing editor — says there was "nobody more essential to carrying out" President Trump's "America First" agenda than former Attorney General Jeff Sessions. 
www.breitbart.com
1 week ago
Donald Trump is obstructing justice, and doesn’t care who knows it. Will his newly-installed flunky fire Mueller? Throughout the 2016 campaign and into Donald Trump’s first weeks as president, there were numerous very serious D.C. media people who were fully prepared for Trump to pivot into behaving like an actual dignified president rather than an unhinged loudmouth by way of a garishly costumed Batman villain. Suffice it to say, the pivot never happened. However, Trump has engaged in a completely different kind of pivot in the aftermath of the midterm elections. Based on last week’s events, Trump has disposed of any remaining pretense of innocence. In other words, before the election, Trump at least tried to pretend he wasn’t a disruptive-slash-destructive chaos agent. But now, in defeat, Trump’s putting it all out there, literally daring the incoming Democratic House to do something about it. Look no further than his press conference the day after the election for p...
www.alternet.org
1 week ago
During a Sunday interview on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) weighed in on acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker’s appointment to replace Jeff Sessions. Margaret Brennan asked Graham, “[A]re you going to ask [Whitaker] to recuse himself and is Matthew Whitaker’s appointment constitutional?” “I think he was appropriately appointed legally,” Graham responded. “I don’t think he has to recuse himself. I am confident the Mueller investigation will be allowed to come to a good, solid conclusion, that there’ll be no political influence put on [FBI special counsel Robert Mueller] by Mr. Whitaker to do anything other than Mr. Mueller’s job.” Brennan noted Whitaker’s previous criticisms of Mueller and his investigation and asked Graham what suggests Whitaker can remain “impartial.” “Well, you don’t recuse somebody because they have opinions different than the...
www.breitbart.com
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